Jesse Horne 1854-1934

Among my matches at 67 markers is a Mr Horne (removing his first name for privacy, as I’ve sent him email but haven’t heard from him as of yet), whose terminal relative is Jesse Horne 1854-1934. I didn’t pay much attention to this match, in part because it was a lesser match at 37 markers, with a diff of 3 at 37. At 67 markers, though, the diff is 4 and the match is thus closer.  So, I sent the man an email and then looked up what I could on Ancestry.

Jesse Horne 1854-1934 is matched to a man in the 1880 census in Shelby County, Tennessee. He is married at this time. In 1900 he is in the same county and state and now has several children. Unlike the previous census, they note that he can read and write and he says he was born in Kentucky. He claims his mother and father were born in Kentucky as well.

The same Ancestry source has a 1850 US Census entry for a possible father. This ‘Jessee Hornes’ is living in Perry County, TN, but a closer read of the census data shows that this Jessee Hornes claims to have been born in TN, about 1820.

In 1820 there are a fair number of Myers in Tennessee. By 1840 most of them are gone, to Missouri for the most part. But I can’t eliminate the possibility that a Cove Creek Myers (or close relative) fathered this Jessee Hornes, or alternatively, was the parent of Jessee Hornes’s father. In fact the few times I’ve looked at a TIP calculation of these possibilities, those odds were substantial.

And if the father is actually born in Kentucky, I’ll note, as just one example, that David Crockett’s autobiography speak of various traveling Myers selling wares out of Greene County, Tennessee.

To note, this match may be a product of luck. If I had any advice for a male Horne who is a direct descendant of Jesse 1854-1934, it would be to get an accurate YDNA haplotype. A P312 test at YSEQ is pretty cheap. Z39300+ tests don’t exist in isolation, and someone would have to decide if the $600 or so for a BIGY would be worth it. And if the Horne males are P312+, they can join the P312 project at ftDNA, and then let the experts there guide the search. I will note that my line of Myers YDNA is rare. If we are matched, it will stick out like a sore thumb on the BIGY test.

Update: While I didn’t initially realize it, ‘Horn’ can be a German name. Horn and variants of Horn (Hornung, Hornberger, etc) can be parsed from Pennsylvania German Pioneers. My first try picked up about 92 males with ‘Horn’ or some variant thereof. So one possibility, which I hadn’t initially considered, is that a common ancestor, if he exists, would be found on the other side of the Atlantic. A German Horn would come to the states in the 18th century, and migrate to Kentucky in the late 18th, early 19th century.

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